Today the geese arrived.

Grey and dull but sooo nice!

Grey and dull but sooo nice!

Unfortunately I never got the chance of taking a photo of them flying by because we were walking in the forest when they passed above us. I could hear them for quite some time but couldn’t figure out where they were until they were straight above us. I saw them only long enough to see that it wasn’t Canadian geese but that’s it.

 

Even if it was so quiet that it felt like we were the only ones alive I could see signs of other being around :-) The smoke coming out of the chimney and the horses eating :-)

Even if it was so quiet that it felt like we were the only ones alive I could see signs of other being around πŸ™‚ The smoke coming out of the chimney and the horses eating πŸ™‚

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It’s a bit fun, I’ve been grumpy about not being able to walk in to the bog through the forest on this side of the village since hunters have been out there, now when they have stopped for the season I had no wish to go in there this morning πŸ™‚ Instead we walked to the little lake in the forest and up those ridges again. I think they mostly consists of sand, gravel and stones and that it was the big ice that once created them so many thousands of years ago.Β 

 

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They have tried to see if our bog was a good peat bog so here and there I can find some square holes in the ground, now filled with water and possible perfect places for water voles. But our bog isn't a peat bog, it is just the opposite, full of lime.

They have tried to see if our bog was a good peat bog so here and there I can find some square holes in the ground, now filled with water and possible perfect places for water voles. But our bog isn’t a peat bog, it is just the opposite, full of lime.

 

The ice age didn’t just stop and started to melt away the ice in a steady flow, some years were warmer and some colder and every now and again the ice stopped and deposited lots of debrisΒ (like sand, stones and gravel in huge piles that became todays ridges). Here the ice must have grown and shrunk since there are several ridges with steep walls and small valleys in between. Some places are like big pots with no way to go down to the bottom since the walls are so steep.

 

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Well the small dogs and I may have made it down but not the old guys, they had problems enough when we found a road leading down into one, up however was no problem at all. They have cut down the trees there from time to time, some just a year ago or so but some trees are old and very high. I found two spruces that must have been at least 40 meters high (more or less the same in yards) and they must have been old because our spruces usually never get higher than 50 meters.

 

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We walked the same way up on the ridge at first but turned right when I found an old road to walk on.

 

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In some of the valleys trees grow so close that it is impossible to walk there.

 

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Here’s one of the easy to reach valleys and they have of course cut down trees there. All trees are big but some are even bigger. I can imagine how great the micro climate is down there.

 

 

The walk was really nice since the wind didn’t blow and it neither rained nor snowed, that will all start later today. It’s a few degrees above freezing and I could walk all the way with my jacket open. It was so quiet when we started walking that it felt we were the only ones alive, not even the birds made any noise πŸ™‚ Suddenly when we had walked quite some distance on those ridges I heard a rooster! I then realised that if we had had a frozen bog I would have been able to just continue on the ridge we were walking on until it reached the bog and then we could have walked home that way πŸ™‚ Now we had to turn back again, we were out walking for almost two hours πŸ™‚

 

Some however have at least a small  glade where one could walk.

Some however have at least a small glade where one could walk.

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Hector was the one who decided in what pace we should walk because last week we did a bit too much walking in perhaps a bit too fast pace for him so he had big problems walking our last walk for the weekend, he limped so bad that I was worried it might have been too much to recover from. But today all went well and he’s ready for another walk πŸ™‚

 

An old road went down one of them though and that road leads to the cottage that is even more remotely placed from the world than the one I live in :-) The road isn't used much though, they have a better one they use, close to the farm with the two horses I often show here.

An old road went down one of them though and that road leads to the cottage that is even more remotely placed from the world than the one I live in πŸ™‚ The road isn’t used much though, they have a better one they use, close to the farm with the two horses I often show here.

I astimate that these trees are around 40 meter high and they weren't the highest.

I estimate that these trees are around 40 meter high and they weren’t the highest.

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The fire is burning in the stove and I feel it is time for me to take a small nap. The dogs and cats are already sleeping so I think it isn’t more than right that I can do that too πŸ™‚

 

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Have a great day!

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18 responses

  1. Caryn

    Hi Christer,
    That was a lovely and new view. You could check the internet for the geology of your village to see if those ridges are indeed glacial leavings or something else.
    I meant to comment yesterday on the tree mushrooms. The ones yesterday had such interesting colors. They did look a bit evil, though. The ones today look like goose bills sticking out of the tree trunks. πŸ™‚
    The forests around my area have mostly been left alone for quite some time. The old farms from 1800’s were allowed to grow back to forest again. A lot of those have since been built over but the areas that were set aside have a succession of ages of trees. There is a lot of undergrowth, too. For most of those woods, you have to have paths or you won’t get far and you will most likely get wet. The geology here is long parallel ridges of granite with wetland in between.

    It’s sunny but very cold again. Later today the snow comes in for a while before it turns to freezing rain and rain tomorrow. I found Cadbury mini eggs in the store yesterday. Spring cannot be far off now. Right. πŸ™‚

    Enjoy the day.

    February 21, 2015 at 1:34 pm

    • Hi Caryn!

      It’s nice to be able to show something else for once, well it is still forrest πŸ™‚
      I have tried to find anythiung about our geology but can’t really find anything about the area around my village. I guess we are too far from the main town to be interesting enough πŸ™‚

      I do like those red and yellow colors those mushrooms have. I used to pick home some when ever they had thinned out the forest but I came to thgink about if it is wise to bring those in to a cottage made from wood πŸ™‚

      There was very little forest here just years ago, the entire bog was totally tree free but I think this part might have been filled with trees because of the size of those trees. It takes at least 80 years for a spruce to get that big here. The rest of the forest isn’Γ€t older than 50 years. I did find something about the geology in the county though and it sounds much like what You have. The big mountains though are mostly diabase-covered plateau mountains, beneath the diabas it’s mostly lime stone.

      Those eggs can be found herev too now πŸ™‚ and the big papier machΓ© eggs we fill and give to children at easter eve. A bit early perhaps but I guess we should be happy they didn’t start to sell easter things the day after Christmas πŸ™‚

      Have a great day!
      Christer.

      February 21, 2015 at 3:05 pm

      • Caryn

        The Easter things were lying in wait for Valentine’s Day to pass. They showed up immediately afterwards. Time and tide and Easter candy wait for no man. πŸ™‚

        February 21, 2015 at 5:37 pm

      • They had at least patience enough to wait till this week here πŸ™‚ Valentine isn’t that big here so that was nothing stopping them πŸ™‚

        February 21, 2015 at 5:50 pm

  2. Birgit

    Your cranes are already heading north too. I saw a flock flying over my house yesterday, 18 days earlier than last year. Looks like spring will come soon πŸ™‚

    February 21, 2015 at 2:59 pm

    • Hi Birgit!

      The first ones always come too early and almost freeze to death because of a last fight from winter πŸ™‚ But I’m gklad to read that πŸ™‚
      Have a great day!
      Christer.

      February 21, 2015 at 3:06 pm

  3. such a beautiful walk,,, best of all NO SNOW.
    Imagine, Swans yesterday, geese, today, wow, you do look spring like,

    I know if they were to come to us they would turn around very quickly, its cold cold cold, and still snowing!

    February 21, 2015 at 3:25 pm

    • Hi Laurie!

      No snow πŸ™‚ They say some will fall today but it is late and it won’t stay for long on the ground anyway so why bother to fall at all πŸ™‚

      It does look spring like but it is way too early! If things starts to grow now it will most likely freeze to death when the late frost nights come. But I have to admit I love this warm weather πŸ™‚

      Have a great day despite the winter cold!
      Christer.

      February 21, 2015 at 3:29 pm

  4. jaz

    we call those ridges moraines here. we have lots of them just north from me. we had a wonderful snow storm here this morning. brendan and i drove to a farm market and i can tell you that people really don’t know how to drive in the snow! i’m glad hector recovered quickly!

    February 21, 2015 at 6:53 pm

    • Hi Joyce!

      We actually do that too, morΓ€n in Swedish but I had totally forgotten that until I read Your comment πŸ™‚

      I’m so glad You got a snow storm and not only the cold and ice! It’s fun because You want the snow and have gotten very little this winter other American blog friends hate it and have soo much of it now πŸ™‚

      People in the big cities here can’t drive in snow, they are really dangerous out on the roads. I wonder why it is that way here since we actually usually get lots of it πŸ™‚

      Me too, I was a bit worried there for a while.

      Have a great day!
      Christer.

      February 21, 2015 at 7:26 pm

  5. Dianna

    Hi Christer! Boy, I wish I lived in a place where if I was out walking it would feel like I was the only one alive. Not where I live, too suburbia in a large city. I would like to just walk out my front door and into a forest! πŸ™‚ Poor Hector! Our Willow is like that. Our vet calls it the weekend warrior syndrome. Too much too fast on a weekend makes her limp! And believe it or not, she has the same benign tumor that our husky Tor has, but on her shoulder. Tor has his inside his leg, into his groin area. Apparently its quite common in big dogs. I have had big dogs my whole life, this is the first time I have ever had not one but two of my dogs with the same tumor. Crazy!! We are, once again, under an extreme weather warning. \
    Windchills in the “skin freezes in one minute” range. I am getting rather tired of this. I am glad you heard geese, that is a good sign! Let me know when you see the Canadian ones…..then I know for sure spring is not far away and they are coming home! πŸ™‚ Have a good Saturday evening!

    February 21, 2015 at 10:32 pm

    • Hi Dianna!

      I could actually experience that feeling when I lived in Gothenburg too, around 4am in a Sunday morning πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ If I was lucky no one was driving around in a nosiy car and it was just about when all people who had been out partying had come home and no one was up to get to work πŸ™‚ It happens more often and later in the morning too though πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

      We’ll just have to work slower so Hector doesn’t over do it again. He just loves our walks so not going out more than a short one is no option. Slower and with more stops to smell the nature πŸ™‚

      One of my dogs got benign tumors all of sorts all her life but none of the others have ad she was only slightly bigger than Nova and Sune. All the rest have thankfully stayed away from them. Ok, they are usually easily removed but still. The shoulder is an easier place to have it though, isn’t in the way like in the groin area.

      I saw these geese too and the Canadian one is so easy to recognize because of its dark head and neck. I will tell You as soon as I see them πŸ™‚

      The snow we got yesterday is still hanging around, the temperature during ther night has been just enough low to allow that. I’m not happy about it but the morning will at least be brighter even if the sun doesn’t show πŸ™‚

      Have a great day!
      Christer.

      February 22, 2015 at 5:57 am

  6. Robin Larkspar

    Great walking tour today, and I am glad Hector did okay. The glade you showed us looks like a nice little place for a picnic and a nap. You are so lucky not to have snow and warmer temperatures than here. Nice to walk in the forest with insects pestering you.

    February 22, 2015 at 4:15 am

    • Hi Robin!
      It was nice to be able to show something else than Iusually do, even if this is forest too πŸ™‚ I do wonder I do wonder if that part of the forest have as many nasty biting flies as it has here in the part. If not it would be a nice place to have a picnic πŸ™‚

      I’m glad too, now we’ll have to walk slower and take more breaks so he still can enjoy our walks πŸ™‚

      We actually have snow on the ground this morning, the temperature sank just enough to make that happen. It won’t stay for long if the predictions are right πŸ™‚

      Have a great day!
      Christer.

      February 22, 2015 at 6:01 am

  7. Christer, you live in a Fairy Tale world. My wish to have a home that I could sit outside and see a forest..take long walks. It is something I’ve missed since I was small. I was raised in similar countryside and I miss it. What a beautiful world we live in. That’s why I plant so many tree’s around our little home. Eleven so far.
    Such beautiful country.

    February 22, 2015 at 6:28 am

    • Hi Mona!

      I miss the ocean but love the forest too much to even think of moving anywhere else πŸ™‚ It was fun to find these parts of the forest that isn’t disturbed so much by deforestation. But I think this soon will be part of the pastures so they will be hard to reach in the future.

      How’s Your redwood doing? I guess they grow fast when they are young, will they even fit in Your garden when they have grown up? πŸ™‚ I have read that there are garden varieties that don’t become that high as wild ones do, is that what You have?

      Have a great day!
      Christer.

      February 22, 2015 at 6:36 am

      • Our’s are Coastal Redwoods..and yes, they are a concern. I won’t live to see them at their tallest.. and I do feel a wee guilty for planting tree’s that I know will grow quite large. . The are already challanging our 55 year old Canary Island Pine tree..and it’s pretty big as are the cyprustree that line our drive way. So..the answer is that I don’t know if I have planted the “wild kind” or not. I bought them at our local nursury so who knows. Since they are coastal redwoods they could be the giants. I’m not sure. It took thousands perhaps a million years to grow the ones on our coasts..and none of us will be around to see. πŸ™‚

        February 23, 2015 at 8:22 am

      • Don’t feel guilty! They are the most impressive trees there is and I’ve read that they only grow fast as young trees and then slow don considerable. I think I’ve read that they can spread via their roots, so if You see small ones some distance away from Your trees they most likely are the wild kind. I would love to have them here but the winters are too dark. I know they have them further south but those will never be as impressive as the ones living in California. I might be able to have the Chinese sequoia though but it is a midget beside Your Redwoods, they only grow to 299 foot high πŸ™‚

        February 23, 2015 at 6:29 pm

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